The Work of the People

JAN 26, 2015 - Visual Epistles
Preview_screen_shot_2014-06-23_at_5.25.43_pm

Rebirth and Recovery

Many Christians see being “reborn” as a one-time experience. One day we are not a Christian and the next day we are. However, author, Glennon Doyle Melton sees each day as an opportunity of rebirth. In this video, she speaks about how rebirth, like any kind of birth, involves uncomfortable experiences, but experiences that are transformative.

Questions for Reflection

  1. Melton starts by recounting a time when the interviewer dismissed her history of recovery: “That’s okay, we don’t need to talk about that. That’s your old life. That’s not you anymore.” This was upsetting to Melton because she says, “That is who I am. I am a recovering addict.” Why might our stories of recovery and/or redemption an important part of our lives? Why shouldn’t these things be forgotten?
  2. Melton says, “[This story of recovery] is a daily story for me because every single day, I have to get to that point of surrender.” How might you come to a point of surrender even though you might not be a recovering addict? Why might that point of daily surrender be important for all Christians?
  3. The reason why recovering addicts are Melton’s favorite people is that “recovering addicts are people who have been brought to their knees and had to admit it out loud. And that is an amazing place to start.” Melton sees that important places to start are “a life of recovery or a life of faith.” Where are you in the process or either recovery or faith?
  4. Melton reflects, “Life is so hard; with God and with other people, life is still so hard. What I am learning though is that hard part of life can transform me. But it can only transform me if I refuse to run from it or numb it.” How do we often run from the difficulties of life? What strategies do we often use to numb or run from life rather than be transformed by it?
  5. Melton talks about “sitting through uncomfortable feelings.” She then cites the the Buddhist monk, Pema, saying, “If we can sit with the hot loneliness for 1.6 seconds today when yesterday we could only sit with it for 1 second then that is the journey of a warrior.” How can we do a better job “sitting through uncomfortable feelings” and “being still” with them?
  6. Melton talks about how “recovery and faith is a daily journey” and that being “reborn” is not a one-time experience. How is it that rebirth is a daily experience? What would it mean to be reborn daily? 

Question by Phuc Luu

comments powered by Disqus

About Altɐr

We believe there is an alternative narrative to the prevalent narrative of scarcity and fear. We believe God is moving and is behind an alternative narrative of abundance and freedom, a narrative in which fear gets defeated and love wins.

We believe God’s narrative requires we altǝr our perspective, that we step, in faith, into God’s upside down reality. In God’s reality we listen for, live and speak God’s upside down voice of faith, hope and love, not striving for ourselves but serving our neighbor. For all these reasons, this is Altǝr.

Stir Imagination. Spark discussion.

The Work of the People

Copyright © The Work of the People 2018. All rights reserved. Site by State.